Letterhead

While processing records on campus buildings, I couldn’t help but notice the fine examples of early twentieth century letterhead.  Mainly from the Buffalo and Niagara Falls vicinity, these companies bid or worked on the addition to the Koessler Administration building.  This selection is from 1907.

The Queen City Cut Stone Company, Buffalo (NY)

The Queen City Cut Stone Company, Buffalo (NY)

Byrne and Bannister, Contractors for Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY).  Byrne and Bannister worked on several well-known local buildings, including St. Louis Church, Hotel Lafayette, and the Seymour H. Knox residence.

Byrne and Bannister, Contractors for Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY). Byrne and Bannister worked on several well-known local buildings, including St. Louis Church, Hotel Lafayette, and the Seymour H. Knox residence.

Thomas Brown Contracting Company, Buffalo (NY)

Thomas Brown Contracting Company, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Expanded Metal Company, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Expanded Metal Company, Buffalo (NY)

Stearns Electric Equipment Company, Buffalo (NY)

Stearns Electric Equipment Company, Buffalo (NY)

C.A. Criqui Hygenic Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating Contractor, Buffalo (NY)

C.A. Criqui Hygenic Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating Contractor, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Mantel Manufacturing Company, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Mantel Manufacturing Company, Buffalo (NY)

"Estimates cheerfully furnished" by Cyrus B. Rees, Washington DC

Duparquet, Huot, and Moneuse Company, Manufacturers of Imperial French Ranges, High Grade Cooking Apparatus, Washington DC

Duparquet, Huot, and Moneuse Company, Manufacturers of Imperial French Ranges, High Grade Cooking Apparatus, Washington DC

James M. Davis and Son, General Contractors in Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY)

James M. Davis and Son, General Contractors in Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY)

John Feist and Sons Company, Planing Mill, Buffalo (NY)

John Feist and Sons Company, Planing Mill, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Wholesale Hardware, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Wholesale Hardware, Buffalo (NY)

F.T. Coppins and Son, Painters and Decorators, Buffalo (NY)

F.T. Coppins and Son, Painters and Decorators, Buffalo (NY)

Joseph F. Stabell, Engineer - Contractor, Buffalo (NY)

Joseph F. Stabell, Engineer - Contractor, Buffalo (NY)

Timothy McEvoy and Son, Buffalo (NY)

Timothy McEvoy and Son, Buffalo (NY)

The F.P. Little Elctrical Company, Buffalo (NY)

The F.P. Little Elctrical Company, Buffalo (NY)

Stokes Brothers, Building Contractors, Buffalo (NY)

Stokes Brothers, Building Contractors, Buffalo (NY)

John Lennon, Son and Company, Contractors and Builders, Niagara Falls (NY)

John Lennon, Son and Company, Contractors and Builders, Niagara Falls (NY)

Buffalo Structural Steel, Buffalo (NY)

Buffalo Structural Steel, Buffalo (NY)

Slack and Ellis, Cut Stone Contractors, Medina (NY)

Slack and Ellis, Cut Stone Contractors, Medina (NY)

Cyrus B. Rees, Heating by Hot Water and Vapor, Washington DC

Cyrus B. Rees, Heating by Hot Water and Vapor, Washington DC

The Queen City Cut Stone Company, Buffalo (NY)Byrne and Bannister, Contractors for Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY).  Byrne and Bannister worked on several well-known local buildings, including St. Louis Church, Hotel Lafayette, and the Seymour H. Knox residence.Thomas Brown Contracting Company, Buffalo (NY)Buffalo Expanded Metal Company, Buffalo (NY)Stearns Electric Equipment Company, Buffalo (NY)C.A. Criqui Hygenic Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating Contractor, Buffalo (NY)Buffalo Mantel Manufacturing Company, Buffalo (NY)"Estimates cheerfully furnished" by Cyrus B. Rees, Washington DCDuparquet, Huot, and Moneuse Company, Manufacturers of Imperial French Ranges, High Grade Cooking Apparatus, Washington DCJames M. Davis and Son, General Contractors in Plain and Ornamental Plastering, Buffalo (NY)John Feist and Sons Company, Planing Mill, Buffalo (NY)Buffalo Wholesale Hardware, Buffalo (NY)F.T. Coppins and Son, Painters and Decorators, Buffalo (NY)Joseph F. Stabell, Engineer - Contractor, Buffalo (NY)Timothy McEvoy and Son, Buffalo (NY)The F.P. Little Elctrical Company, Buffalo (NY)Stokes Brothers, Building Contractors, Buffalo (NY)John Lennon, Son and Company, Contractors and Builders, Niagara Falls (NY)Buffalo Structural Steel, Buffalo (NY)Slack and Ellis, Cut Stone Contractors, Medina (NY)Cyrus B. Rees, Heating by Hot Water and Vapor, Washington DC


 

 

New Exhibit!

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David Copperfield: Dickens’ Favorite Child is now open on the 3rd floor of the Montante Family Library through March 31, 2013.  The D’Youville College Archives holds a rare, first edition David Copperfield, complete in its original paper wrappers.  As Dickens called Copperfield his favorite of all his works, the exhibit explores the experiences that influenced its writing and publication.

“An Energy of the Fieriest Description”

David Copperfield was first published as a serial in 19 monthly parts from May 1849 to November 1850.  This was Dickens’ eighth novel and marked a significant change from his earlier works.  First, Copperfield is written in the first person.  Second, experiences from his life feature prominently.  His father’s term in debtors’ prison (and even his speech patterns) take the form of Mr. Micawber.  Dickens’ own time working at a blacking factory as a child is reflected in David’s brutal experience at Murdstone and Grinby’s warehouse.  In July 1849, Dickens wrote to his friend John Forster, “I really think I have done it ingeniously, and with a very complicated interweaving of truth and fiction.”

Dickens began writing Copperfield in February 1849, only three months before the first installment was published.  For the duration of this work, he stuck to a fairly rigid writing schedule, and wrote each number in the first 2 weeks of the month with “an energy of the fieriest description.”  In the summer of 1849 while on holiday with his family, he expressed his wish to be left alone from waking until 2pm, referring to this time as his “hard Copperfieldian mornings.”

Copperfield was well-received and has become Dickens best known work.  Biographer and historian Claire Tomalin describes the sense of realism and the depiction of childhood Dickens captured: “…the voice of childhood was truly rendered by Dickens out of his own experience – and out of his imagination….His descriptions are so finely accurate that he seems to be watching something taking place before his eyes as he writes….”

In the Preface of the 1850 edition, Dickens reflected on Copperfield:

My interest in it, is so recent and strong; and my mind is so divided between pleasure and regret—pleasure in the achievement of a long design, regret in the separation from many companions….

Instead of looking back, therefore, I will look forward. I cannot close this Volume more agreeably to myself, than with a hopeful glance towards the time when I shall again put forth my two green leaves once a month, and with a faithful remembrance of the genial sun and showers that have fallen on these leaves of David Copperfield, and made me happy.

The exhibit is on display until March 31, 2013 during regular library hours.  Directions to the Montante Family Library can be found here.


 

 

Exhibit Sneak Peek

The College Archives has a new exhibit space located on the 3rd floor of the Montante Family Library.  The first exhibit, David Copperfield: Dickens’ Favorite Child will open in a few weeks.  Below are a few sneak peek images of the space renovation and items featured in the exhibit.

Dickens at the time of Copperfield publication, 1850.

Dickens at the time of Copperfield publication, 1850.

Uriah Heep, from Frederick Barnard's Character Sketches from Dickens.

Uriah Heep, from Frederick Barnard's Character Sketches from Dickens.

Exhibit area, 3rd floor of Montante Family Library

Exhibit area, 3rd floor of Montante Family Library

Map and engraving of Covent Garden and Drury Lane theater district, London.  From London Illustrata.

Map and engraving of Covent Garden and Drury Lane theater district, London. From London Illustrata.

David Copperfield 1st edition, in original wrappers

David Copperfield 1st edition, in original wrappers

Dr. Henry Lappin, D'Youville College professor.  Lappin recommended the library purchase David Copperfield in 1927.

Dr. Henry Lappin, D'Youville College professor. Lappin recommended the library purchase David Copperfield in 1927.

Dickens at the time of Copperfield publication, 1850.Uriah Heep, from Frederick Barnard's Character Sketches from Dickens.Exhibit area, 3rd floor of Montante Family LibraryMap and engraving of Covent Garden and Drury Lane theater district, London.  From London Illustrata.David Copperfield 1st edition, in original wrappersDr. Henry Lappin, D'Youville College professor.  Lappin recommended the library purchase David Copperfield in 1927.


 

Digitization project

The D’Youville College Archives is proud to announce that we will be part of New York Heritage Digital Collections.

Digitization of a portion of the D’Youville College Archives Photograph collection will be completed by 3 students from the University at Buffalo Department of Library and Information Science as part of LIS563, Digital Libraries.

The students will scan and edit photographs, create metadata, and upload all corresponding files and descriptive information to NY Heritage, with work completed by mid-December, 2012.

The D’Youville College Archives Photograph collection contains roughly 1,000 photographs, mainly from the early 1900s to the present. Major subjects are buildings, graduations, student activities, and campus events. This project will focus on photographs relating to College buildings and grounds and consist of 30 images. The majority of photos are black and white, and images on buildings and grounds make up about one-third of the greater Archives Photograph collection.

The College Photograph collection is the most heavily used record group in our institutional holdings [of our current 12 record groups]. Both internal and external patrons use this collection, and requests often cover all subjects. Digitization of photos relating to college buildings and grounds will serve as a pilot project for future digitization of the greater photograph collection and other archives holdings in 2013.


 

Heritage Series, Part 2

In celebration of the 75th anniversary of D’Youville College, Sr. Mary Sheila Driscoll (1911-1994), second College Archivist, created a pamphlet series on the history and founding of D’Youville College.  Periodically, these pamphlets will be digitized and posted online.  Below are the first 3 pamphlets in the series:

The Administration Building, 1874 – 1908  

A Wing is Built; A College is Born, 1908 

Those Early Years –  The Seeds are Sown, 1908 – 1919


 

Welcome Back!

To celebrate the start of a new semester, take a look back at past students, the college, and student activities.

Students moving in to Madonna, circa 1978.

Students moving in to Madonna, circa 1978.

Students playing cards in Madonna lobby, 1959.

Students playing cards in Madonna lobby, 1959.

Old chemistry lab, 3rd floor of Koessler Administration Building, circa 1939.

Old chemistry lab, 3rd floor of Koessler Administration Building, circa 1939.

Freshmen, 1940.

Freshmen, 1940.

Library media room, 1956.

Library media room, 1956.

Bookstore, 1950.

Bookstore, 1950.

Dorm room, Koessler, 1947.

Dorm room, Koessler, 1947.

Health Sciences classroom, 1968.

Health Sciences classroom, 1968.

Working on the newspaper, 1968.

Working on the newspaper, 1968.

Students moving in to Madonna, circa 1978.Students playing cards in Madonna lobby, 1959.Old chemistry lab, 3rd floor of Koessler Administration Building, circa 1939.Freshmen, 1940.Library media room, 1956.Bookstore, 1950.Dorm room, Koessler, 1947.Health Sciences classroom, 1968.Working on the newspaper, 1968.


 

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Heritage Series : Administration Building, 1874 – 1900

Sister Mary Sheila Driscoll (1911-1994) was the second D’Youville College Archivist, succeeding Sister St. Mary Jones.  In celebration of the 75th anniversary of the College, Sr. Mary Sheila created a pamphlet series on the history and founding of D’Youville College.

Periodically, a new pamphlet will be digitized and linked on this site.  Below is the first in this series, The Administration Building, 1874-1900.

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Pamphlet cover.

Administration building

Administration building

The original building, now the Koessler Administration building, as it appeared in 1872. Holy Angels Church is visible in the background.

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Page 2, "The Beginning."

Dr. R.V. Pierce's Palace Hotel, 1877

Dr. R.V. Pierce's Palace Hotel, 1877

Pierce's Hotel stood on Prospect between Porter and Connecticut, now the site of Alt and the Bauer Academic Center.

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Page 3, "The West Side," "The Fire," and "The West Wing."

Administration building, 1887 (1)

Administration building, 1887 (1)

Rebuilt Administration building with additional West Wing after the fire of 1887.

Administration building, 1887 (2)

Administration building, 1887 (2)

Rebuilt Administration building with additional West Wing after the fire of 1887.

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900

Page 4, "The West Wing, cont."

Administration building, 1983

Administration building, 1983

Koessler Administration building, as it appeared when Sr. Mary Sheila wrote this pamphlet. Over the years, the brick had been painted cream from its original red.

Koessler Administration building, 1985

Koessler Administration building, 1985

Koessler, as it appears today. The cream paint was sandblasted from the brick in 1985, restoring it to its original red brick.

Sister Mary Sheila Driscoll

Sister Mary Sheila Driscoll

Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900Administration buildingHeritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900Dr. R.V. Pierce's Palace Hotel, 1877Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900Administration building, 1887 (1)Administration building, 1887 (2)Heritage Series: The Administration Building, 1874 - 1900Administration building, 1983Koessler Administration building, 1985Sister Mary Sheila Driscoll


 

What makes a book rare?

Many factors are used, often in combination, to determine if a book is “rare.”  Below is a primer describing several factors that can be used in this regard:

Edition

Edition

First edition, in original wrappers of Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, 1849.

Age

Age

Divi Gregorii theologi episcopi Nazanzeni, De Theologia libri quinque (On Vs Ecclesie), published 1523. [Translation: The First Theological Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus, translated by Petrus Mosellanus]

Age

Age

Divi Gregorii theologi episcopi Nazanzeni, De Theologia libri quinque (On Vs Ecclesie), published 1523. [Translation: The First Theological Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus, translated by Petrus Mosellanus]

Binding

Binding

Dante nelle memorie dei poeti italiani. Bound by Vida Benedict.

Author Signatures and Inscriptions

Author Signatures and Inscriptions

Alfred Noyes' Some Aspects of Modern Poetry, inscribed to D'Youville College. Noyes is best known for his 1906 poem "The Highwayman."

Illustrations

Illustrations

Chromolithograph illuminations by Owen Jones and Henry Warren. The Paradise and the Peri, 1860.

Illustrations

Illustrations

Chromolithograph illuminations by Owen Jones and Henry Warren. The Paradise and the Peri, 1860.

Printer

Printer

History of Helyas, Knight of the Swan. Printed by the Grolier Club, 1901.

Printer

Printer

History of Helyas, Knight of the Swan. Printed by the Grolier Club, 1901.

Annotations

Annotations

Praelectiones in Summam theologicam : divi Thomae Aquinatis. Annotations by Buffalo Bishop William Turner.

Annotations

Annotations

Praelectiones in Summam theologicam : divi Thomae Aquinatis. Annotations by Buffalo Bishop William Turner.

EditionAgeAgeBindingAuthor Signatures and InscriptionsIllustrationsIllustrationsPrinterPrinterAnnotationsAnnotations


 

Caring for glass plate negatives

The D’Youville College Archives has a small collection of glass plate negatives.  The techniques shown below provide a brief introduction in handling glass plate photographic material.  Note: These glass plates were small, with no cracks or breaks.  For information on the handling and storage of large and/or damaged plates, see Further Resources below.

Original storage enclosure

Original storage enclosure

Glass plate negatives were found in plastic sleeves. Plastic is a poor choice for glass negative storage. The plastic can have a static charge which will lift flaking emultions.

Damaged emulsion

Damaged emulsion

Flaking emulsion on the glass negative. In a glass plate negative, the glass is the base, which serves to support the emulsion. The emulsion contains the image. Flaking emulsion results in image loss.

Removing plate from original enclosure

Removing plate from original enclosure

Working with the emulsion side down, the plastic sleeve is cut along one edge and lifted off the plate. Which side has the emulsion? Generally, the emulsion side is dull and much less reflective than the base (glass) side.

Handling

Handling

Hold glass plates by the edges. Gloves are helpful in protecting emulsions from fingerprints.

Archival enclosure

Archival enclosure

Glass plate negatives should be stored in paper enclosures. Be sure that the enclosures have passed PAT (photographic activity test).

Identification

Identification

Write a description for the plate on the enclosure BEFORE enclosing the plate. For fragile materials such as glass plates, it is best to be as specific as possible in the description to avoid unnecessary handling of the object.

Storage

Storage

Place the glass emulsion side down on the enclosure.

Storage

Storage

Fold over the enclosure flaps. Do not press down on the glass plate.

Box

Box

Store glass plates on the long edge. Plates should be vertical and not slanted, leaning in any manner, or shift within the box. Use bolsters to maintain verticality and support.

Dividers

Dividers

Using foam core or other rigid divider every several plates will also provide support and maintain plate position.

Label

Label

Glass plates are heavy and fragile. Be sure to alert staff of box contents in clear labels.

Original storage enclosureDamaged emulsionRemoving plate from original enclosureHandlingArchival enclosureIdentificationStorageStorageBoxDividersLabel

Further Resources:

  1. Care of Photographs, Northeast Document Conservation Center.  Preservation leaflet 5.3
  2. How do I House Glass Plate Negatives?, National Archives.
  3. Photographs: Archival Care and Management, Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O’Connor.  Chicago: Society of American Archivist, 2006.