“Can I have this dance?” DYC Dance Cards

DYC Junior Prom 1924

DYC Junior Prom 1924

DYC Junior Prom 1924

DYC Junior Prom 1924

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1939

DYC Junior Prom 1941

DYC Junior Prom 1941

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1942

DYC Junior Prom 1949

DYC Junior Prom 1949

DYC Junior Prom 1949

DYC Junior Prom 1949

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi --

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Spring Frolic" 1950

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi --

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Spring Whirl" 1949

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi --

Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Paris au Printemps" 1956

DYC Junior Prom 1924DYC Junior Prom 1924DYC Junior Prom 1939DYC Junior Prom 1939DYC Junior Prom 1939DYC Junior Prom 1941DYC Junior Prom 1942DYC Junior Prom 1942DYC Junior Prom 1942DYC Junior Prom 1949DYC Junior Prom 1949Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Spring Frolic" 1950Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Spring Whirl" 1949Alpha Sigma and Kappa Chi -- "Paris au Printemps" 1956

Dance cards are small, decorative, booklets that were used in the 19th and early 20th century for a young woman to record the names of the gentlemen she would dance with at a formal ball. Each song played would have a space for the woman to write down the name of the man she would dance with for that song. Dance cards are believed to have become popular in the 19th century in Vienna during large balls. The cards were designed to hang from the wrist or dress of the young woman, using a cord attached the card. Often the cards would also have a pencil attached so as to make adding names more convenient.

D’Youville has a wonderful collection of dance cards that range from as early as 1912, all the way into the 50′s. Although many of the cards are made out of paper, a few have velvet and even hammered metal covers. The dance cards give us a view into what student life was like early in the college’s history.

*The images above are a small sample of the Dance Card Collection. Stop by the college archives on the 3rd floor the the Montante Family Library to view the entire collection.

 

Caring for glass plate negatives

The D’Youville College Archives has a small collection of glass plate negatives.  The techniques shown below provide a brief introduction in handling glass plate photographic material.  Note: These glass plates were small, with no cracks or breaks.  For information on the handling and storage of large and/or damaged plates, see Further Resources below.

Original storage enclosure

Original storage enclosure

Glass plate negatives were found in plastic sleeves. Plastic is a poor choice for glass negative storage. The plastic can have a static charge which will lift flaking emultions.

Damaged emulsion

Damaged emulsion

Flaking emulsion on the glass negative. In a glass plate negative, the glass is the base, which serves to support the emulsion. The emulsion contains the image. Flaking emulsion results in image loss.

Removing plate from original enclosure

Removing plate from original enclosure

Working with the emulsion side down, the plastic sleeve is cut along one edge and lifted off the plate. Which side has the emulsion? Generally, the emulsion side is dull and much less reflective than the base (glass) side.

Handling

Handling

Hold glass plates by the edges. Gloves are helpful in protecting emulsions from fingerprints.

Archival enclosure

Archival enclosure

Glass plate negatives should be stored in paper enclosures. Be sure that the enclosures have passed PAT (photographic activity test).

Identification

Identification

Write a description for the plate on the enclosure BEFORE enclosing the plate. For fragile materials such as glass plates, it is best to be as specific as possible in the description to avoid unnecessary handling of the object.

Storage

Storage

Place the glass emulsion side down on the enclosure.

Storage

Storage

Fold over the enclosure flaps. Do not press down on the glass plate.

Box

Box

Store glass plates on the long edge. Plates should be vertical and not slanted, leaning in any manner, or shift within the box. Use bolsters to maintain verticality and support.

Dividers

Dividers

Using foam core or other rigid divider every several plates will also provide support and maintain plate position.

Label

Label

Glass plates are heavy and fragile. Be sure to alert staff of box contents in clear labels.

Original storage enclosureDamaged emulsionRemoving plate from original enclosureHandlingArchival enclosureIdentificationStorageStorageBoxDividersLabel

Further Resources:

  1. Care of Photographs, Northeast Document Conservation Center.  Preservation leaflet 5.3
  2. How do I House Glass Plate Negatives?, National Archives.
  3. Photographs: Archival Care and Management, Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O’Connor.  Chicago: Society of American Archivist, 2006.


 

Preservation Week: April 22 to 28

The American Library Association, Society of American Archivists, Library of Congress and other organizations have started the Preservation Week initiative to

raise awareness about collecting and preservation, to connect the general public to preservation information and expertise, and to emphasize the close relationships among personal, family, community, and public collections and their preservation.*

Are you a genealogist?  Do you have family photos, diaries, old books, or other collectibles and memorabilia?  Here are a few resources to help you take care of those items and organize your research.

Organizing Family Papers

Conducting an Oral History Interview

How to care for Books 

How to care for Photographs

How to care for Textiles, Quilts, and Clothing

Caring for Paper and Works of Art on Paper [Drawings, Watercolors, etc.]

*From SAA Preservation Week website.